CHA Prizes

CHA Prizes

As part of its mandate to promote and recognise excellence in historical research, the CHA awards a series of prizes. 


View past winners

The François-Xavier Garneau Medal

The François-Xavier Garneau Medal, awarded every five years, is the most prestigious of the CHA prizes. It honours an outstanding Canadian contribution to historical research.

 

2020 – Winner


  • Shirley Tillotson

View past winners

The CHA Best Scholarly Book in Canadian History Prize

The prize is given to the non-fiction work of Canadian history judged to have made the most significant contribution to an understanding of the Canadian past.

The 2021 prize competition is now closed. The prize will be attributed at the CHA Annual Meeting in June 2021.

2020 – Winner


  • Eric Reiter

View past winners

The Wallace K. Ferguson Prize

The Wallace K. Ferguson Prize recognises the outstanding scholarly book in a field of history other than Canadian history. 

The 2021 competition is now closed. The prize will be attributed at the CHA Annual Meeting in June 2021.

 

2020 – Winner


  • To be announced shortly - sera révélé sous peu

View past winners

The Clio Prizes

The CHA awards its Clio Awards to the best books in regional history, as well as to individuals or historical societies who have made significant contributions to local and regional history.

The 2021 prize competition is now closed. The prize will be attributed at the CHA Annual Meeting in June 2021.

2020 – Winner


  • Bonnie Morgan, Marie-Eve Ouellet, Carl Benn, Esyllt W. Jones, Bill Waiser, Wendy Wickwire, Karen Routledge.

View past winners

The Albert B. Corey Prize

The biennial Albert B. Corey prize is jointly sponsored by the American Historical Association (AHA) and Canadian Historical Association (CHA) for the best book on the history of Canadian-American relations or the history of both countries. 

The 2022 prize will be administered by the AHA

 

2020 – Winner


  • Jamie Benidickson

View past winners

The John Bullen Prize

The John Bullen Prize honours the outstanding Ph.D. thesis on a historical topic submitted in a Canadian university.

The 2021 prize competition is now closed. The prize will be attributed at the CHA Annual Meeting in June 2021.

2020 – Winner


  • Crystal Fraser

View past winners

The CHA Journal Prize ( The best article from #1 and #2 issues)

The CHA Journal Prize is awarded every year for the best essay published each year in the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association. 

 

2020 – Winner


  • Jason Ellis

View past winners

The Jean-Marie Fecteau Prize

CHA Student Prize

The prize is awarded for the best article published in a peer-reviewed journal (including peer-reviewed student journals) by a PhD of MA-level student, in French or in English.

The 2021 prize competition is now closed. The prize will be attributed at the CHA Annual Meeting in June 2021.

2020 – Winner


  • Kassandra Luciuk

The CHA's Excellence in Teaching with Primary Sources Awards

The Teaching and Learning Committee on the CHA Council is pleased to announce the launch of the 2021 CHA’s Teaching Award:

Excellence in Teaching with Primary Sources

This annual prize seeks to recognize post-secondary instructors teaching in any geographical, thematic, or temporal field in historical studies who have a record of excellence in emphasizing student engagement with primary sources in their courses in effective, critical, sustained, and, possibly, innovative ways. Effective teaching about the question of primary sources and how people today should contend with them are the central aspects of this award.

·      Our definition of “primary sources” should be understood in the broadest terms and includes visual, aural, verbal, material, digital, and memorized or remembered items.

·      This prize does not preclude the consideration of historiographical teaching (i.e./ approaching secondary and tertiary sources as primary sources).

·      This prize does not preclude, and indeed encourages, pedagogy that fosters critical approaches to historical empiricism and “the archive” as embroiled in past and present political struggles.

FOUR (4) winners will be chosen, annually, for this prize: two in the category of “Early or Alternative Career”: One in Canadian history and one in other than Canadian history and two in “Open Career State”: One in Canadian and one in other than Canadian history. Winners will be announced during the 2021 CHA Annual Meeting. The deadline for nomination packages is 1 March 2021.  Nomination packages must be sent to teachingblog@cha-shc.ca on or before the deadline.  For information about nomination package content and judging criteria, see below.

1) Early or Alternative Career Award

·      open to any post-secondary part-time or contract instructor, adjunct professor, or early career (0-5 year), untenured full-time instructor/professor who can

o   demonstrate excellence in teaching with primary sources across a minimum of THREE (3) courses (note: this includes the same course being taught three times, even if all three iterations happened in the same semester)

·      the courses do NOT have to be taught out of a history department but should feature an ongoing historical component to them

·      this category is not open to emeritus faculty

·      people can nominate themselves for this award or be nominated by a peer or department/unit chair 

·      nomination packages can be up to 15 pages long, exclusive of syllabi and the nomination cover page, and must be submitted as a single pdf file

Nomination packages must include:

·      Nomination cover page

Nomination packages may include (this list is not exhaustive or mandatory, just meant to offer examples):

·      a 500-word statement from the instructor outlining and explaining their approach to teaching with primary sources and the three courses (minimum) with which they are applying;

·      a letter of support from the department chair or other full-time faculty member in which the instructor has taught who has witnessed the instructor’s teaching with primary sources and can provide a detailed qualitative assessment of the instructor’s teaching effectiveness;

·      one or more course outlines/syllabi, complete with details of the number of people in the class, assigned readings, and the structure of assignments;

·      testimonies from students who were registered in one or more classes about the teaching effectiveness of the instructor, ideally focused on engagement with primary sources;

·      a detailed assignment from a syllabus that showcases primary source engagement and how this was assessed by the instructor;

·      a detailed lesson plan with a paragraph or more reflecting on the success of the plan

·      formal teaching evaluation reports, or information culled from them (note: this is not mandatory and the adjudicators will be made aware of the numerous critiques that exist about the validity of teaching evaluations)  

Adjudication criteria:

·      teaching how to be critical about primary source engagement

·      depth of focus on primary sources in specific sessions or with specific assignments

·      consistency of focus on primary sources throughout a course and/or throughout 3 courses

·      “focus on primary sources” can mean teaching about: “silences” in the archive, the range of sources available, where to find sources and how to work with them, historical or archival theory especially via specific primary source examples, and/or assignments that incorporate the critical use of primary sources

·      other criteria taken into consideration may include: ability to incorporate a focus on primary sources across a range of courses (i.e./ from low-enrollment seminars to high-enrollment survey courses); ability to teach about a range of types of sources; innovation (factoring in what this might mean for different types of courses); evidence of student satisfaction and teaching effectiveness; the incorporation of non-written, non-English, non-Western, non-modern sources in effective ways.

Nomination packages can be up to 15 pages long, exclusive of syllabi and the nomination cover page, and must be submitted as a single pdf file. Packages should be emailed to. The due date for packages to be received is 1 March 2021. Winners will be announced at the 2021 CHA Annual Meeting.

2) Open Career State Awards

open to any post-secondary instructor (part-time, full-time, contingent, untenured, tenured, emeritus, et cetera) who can demonstrate

a record of excellence in teaching with primary sources across at least SEVEN (7) courses, of which THREE (3) have to be entirely different courses

team-taught courses can count and, in instances where teams have been teaching for FIVE (5) or more courses, teams can apply for this award

the courses do NOT have to be taught out of a history department but should feature an ongoing historical component to them

people can nominate themselves for this award or be nominated by a peer or department/unit chair. 

nomination packages can be up to 25 pages long, exclusive of syllabi and the nomination cover page, and must be submitted as a single pdf file

Nomination packages must include:

·      Nomination cover page

Nomination packages may include (this list is not exhaustive or mandatory, just meant to offer examples):

·      a 500-word statement from the instructor outlining and explaining their approach to teaching with primary sources and the courses with which they are applying;

·      up to two letters of support from full-time faculty members in the department in which the instructor has taught who have witnessed the instructor’s teaching with primary sources and can provide a detailed qualitative assessment of the instructor’s teaching effectiveness;

·      three or more course outlines/syllabi, complete with details of the number of people in the class, assigned readings, and the structure of assignments;

·      testimonies from students who were registered in one or more classes about the teaching effectiveness of the instructor, ideally focused on engagement with primary sources;

·      a detailed assignment from a syllabus that showcases primary source engagement and how this was assessed by the instructor;

·      a detailed lesson plan with a paragraph or more reflecting on the success of the plan

·      formal teaching evaluation reports, or information culled from them (note: this is not mandatory and the adjudicators will be made aware of the numerous critiques that exist about the validity of teaching evaluations) 

Adjudication criteria:

·      teaching how to be critical about primary source engagement

·      depth of focus on primary sources in specific sessions or with specific assignments

·      consistency of focus on primary sources throughout a course and/or throughout 7 courses

·      “focus on primary sources” can mean teaching about: “silences” in the archive, the range of sources available, where to find sources and how to work with them, historical or archival theory especially via specific primary source examples, and/or assignments that incorporate the critical use of primary sources

·      other criteria taken into consideration may include: ability to incorporate a focus on primary sources across a range of courses (i.e./ from low-enrollment seminars to high-enrollment survey courses); ability to teach about a range of types of sources; innovation (factoring in what this might mean for different types of courses); ability to teach about primary sources to different levels (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th-year, MA, PhD; taking into consideration how not all instructors have access to graduate teaching); evidence of student satisfaction and teaching effectiveness; the incorporation of non-written, non-English, non-Western, non-modern sources in effective ways.

Nomination packages can be up to 25 pages long, exclusive of syllabi and the nomination cover page, and must be submitted as a single pdf file. Packages should be emailed to teachingblog@cha-shc.ca. The due date for packages to be received is 1 March 2021. Winners will be announced at the 2021 CHA Annual Meeting.

 

2020 – Winner


  • 2020

View past winners

The Indigenous History Book Prize

The Indigenous History Group, a committee affiliated with the Canadian Historical Association, is pleased to offer a prize for the best book in aboriginal history.

 The Indigenous History Studies Group, an affiliated committee of the Canadian Historical Association, is pleased to solicit submissions for the award for English or French language scholarly books with a publication date of 2020 in the area of Indigenous History in Canada (i.e. scholarly books concerning the history of Indigenous peoples whose territory overlaps with that of the current Canadian state, and/or books concerning Indigenous people whose history involves significant interaction with institutions -- state, ecclesiastic, corporate, or other -- that are closely associated with what would become Canada). The submitted title will build on theoretical, interpretive, and descriptive understandings of the past; contribute to the creation and transmission of knowledge; and show potential readability by a wider audience. Criteria  by which  the  committee  evaluates  entries  include  that  historical  analysis  form  the central basis of the book’s approach (i.e. attention to historical context; primacy of historical sources be they oral, textual, or material; situated within relevant historiography); that it may feature innovative methodology or creative use of source materials, including respect for Indigenous epistemologies alongside or in conjunction with academic scholarship and established academic canon; and that it demonstrates excellence overall, including, of course, the effective and compelling nature of the book’s thesis. The prize will be awarded at the annual meeting of the CHA in June 2021. To enter this competition, a copy of any book you wish to be considered for this prize should be sent to committee members by 31 January 2021. Questions can be directed to Thomas Peace at tpeace@huron.uwo.ca.

Committee Members:

Prof. Carolyn Podruchny                           Prof. Kristin Brunett
1291 Hilton Lane                                           309 Phillips St
Oakville, ON                                                  Thunder Bay, ON
L6M 2V3                                                         P7B 5G9

Prof. Kathryn Labelle                                   Prof. Thomas Peace (non-voting committee chair)
105 Grandview Trail                                      Department of History
Corman Park South, SK                              Huron University College
S7T 0W5                                                          1349 Western Road
                                                                          London, ON
                                                                          N6G 1H3 

Prof. Mathieu Arsenault
Université de Montréal Faculté des arts et des sciences
Département d’histoire Pavillon Lionel-Groulx
3150, Jean-Brillant
Montréal. QC
H3T 1N8

2020 – Winner


  • Sarah Nickel

View past winners

The Indigenous History Best Article Prize

The Indigenous History Group, a committee affiliated with the Canadian Historical Association, is pleased to offer a prize for the best article in aboriginal history.

The Indigenous History Studies Group, a committee affiliated with the Canadian Historical Association, is pleased to announce the 2020 IHSG Article Prize competition. The prize will be awarded to the author of a French or English peer-reviewed article or book chapter that is deemed to make an outstanding contribution to the field. Eligibility: Scholarly articles concerning the histories of Indigenous peoples whose territory overlaps with that of the current Canadian state, and/or articles concerning Indigenous peoples whose history involves significant interaction with institutions (state, ecclesiastic, corporate, or other) that are closely associated with what would become Canada. Articles bearing an imprint of 2020 are eligible. The publisher need not be Canadian, but it must have been subjected to peer review.

Adjudication Criteria:

The award is presented to the author(s) of the best scholarly work in Indigenous history. Criteria by which the committee evaluates entries include that historical analysis form the central basis of the article’s approach (i.e. attention to historical context; primacy of historical sources be they oral, textual, or material; situated within relevant historiography); that it features innovative methodology or creative use of source materials, including respect for Indigenous epistemologies alongside or in conjunction with academic scholarship and established academic canon; and that it demonstrates excellence overall. The publication should show potential readability by a wider audience. The prize will be awarded at the annual meeting of the CHA in June 2021. Entries should be emailed to Thomas Peace at tpeace@huron.uwo.ca by January 31, 2021.

2020 – Winner


  • Madeline Whetung & Krista McCracken

View past winners

The Canadian Committee on Women's and Gender History English-Language Book Prize

The CCWH English-Language Book Prize in Women's and Gender History is awarded every two years to the best book published in the field in the previous two years, in English. Books in Canadian history are eligible for the prize. Books in other national fields are also eligible for the prize, provided that their authors live and work in Canada. 

 

2020 – Winner


  • Valerie Korinek

The Canadian Committee on Women's and Gender History French-Language Book Prize

The CCWGH French-Language Book Prize in Women's and Gender History is awarded every two years to the best book published in the field in the previous two years, in English. Books in Canadian history are eligible for the prize. Books in other national fields are also eligible for the prize, provided that their authors live and work in Canada. 

2020 – Winner


  • Marie-Andrée Lamontagne

View past winners

The Hilda Neatby Prize - English Article

The purpose of the Hilda Neatby Prize in Women's and Gender History, awarded since 1982 by the Canadian Committee in Women's History at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, is to encourage the publication of scholarly articles on women's and gender history. 

2021 Call for Nominations


**Deadline January 31st, 2021**

Any academic article published in Canada and deemed to make an original and scholarly contribution to the field of women's history is eligible.  

ENGLISH LANGUAGE PRIZE:  Any English-language academic article published in Canada during 2020 and deemed to make an original and scholarly contribution to the field of women's and gender history as it relates to women is eligible for nomination for the 2021 Hilda Neatby Prize.

Send nominations, with 1 copy of the nominated article, before January 31st, 2021 to:

Sophie Doucet
Chair
Hilda Neatby Prize Committee
Email address: sophiedou@hotmail.com  

For further information contact or visit the website for the CCWH: http://chashcacommittees-comitesa.ca/ccwh-cchf/.  

2020 – Winner


  • Ashleigh Androsoff

View past winners

The Hilda Neatby Prize - French Article

The purpose of the Hilda Neatby Prize in Women's and Gender History, awarded since 1982 by the Canadian Committee in Women's History at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, is to encourage the publication of scholarly articles on women's and gender history. 

2021 Call for Nominations

**Deadline January 31st, 2021**

Any academic article published in Canada and deemed to make an original and scholarly contribution to the field of women's history is eligible.  

FRENCH LANGUAGE PRIZE:  Any English-language academic article published in Canada during 2020 and deemed to make an original and scholarly contribution to the field of women's and gender history as it relates to women is eligible for nomination for the 2021 Hilda Neatby Prize.

Send nominations, with 1 copy of the nominated article, before January 31st, 2021 to:

Sophie Doucet
Chair
Hilda Neatby Prize Committee
Email address: sophiedou@hotmail.com    

For further information contact or visit the website for the CCWH: http://chashcacommittees-comitesa.ca/ccwh-cchf/.   

2020 – Winner


  • Marilou Tanguay

View past winners

Best Book in Political History Prize 

The prize is awarded for an outstanding, well-written book judged to have made an original, significant, and meritorious contribution to the field of Canadian political history.

Canadian Political History Book Prize (2021)

The Canadian Historical Association’s Political History Group (PHG) is pleased to announce the Canadian Political History Book Prize competition. The prize will be awarded in 2021 for an outstanding, well-written book judged to have made an original, significant, and meritorious contribution to the field of Canadian political history. The PHG considers “Political History” in very broad terms, and encourages the study of politics, public policy, governance, the state, political economy, political sociology, civil society, elections, social movements and their activism, foreign policy, international relations, legal history and other facets of political life from diverse theoretical and empirical approaches.

Eligible books must have been published between 1 December 2019 and 30 November 2020. The award will be given in June 2021 at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association.

The prize will not be awarded if there are fewer than four nominations; however, any books submitted will be considered in the following year's competition.

Authors are invited to submit copies of their books directly to each member of the prize committee or to contact their publishers and ask them to submit copies of their books on their behalf. The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2021.

Considering the current pandemic, it’s not easy for all of the members of the jury to access their institutional office and mail, and to know if this situation is going to change between now and the deadline for submissions. In consequence, we invite the authors and editors to contact the members of the jury through email to ask them at which address they’d like to receive the books submitted for the prize. 

Prof. Harold Bérubé
Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines Université de Sherbrooke
Sherbrooke (Québec) CANADA J1K 2R1
harold.berube@usherbrooke.ca 
 

Prof. David Meren
Département d’histoire Université de Montréal Pavillon Lionel-Groulx
C. P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville Montréal (Québec) CANADA H3C 3J7
david.meren@umontreal.ca 

Prof. Tina Adcock
Department of History Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive
Burnaby (British Columbia) CANADA V5A 1S6
tina_adcock@sfu.ca 

 

 

2020 – Winner


  • Tina Loo

View past winners

Political History Prize - Best Article (English Language)

The Political History Group (PHG), a committee affiliated with the Canadian Historical Association, is pleased to offer a prize for the best article in Canadian political history.

2020 – Winner


  • Jacqueline Briggs

View past winners

Political History Prize - Best Article (French Language)

The Political History Group (PHG), a committee affiliated with the Canadian Historical Association, is pleased to offer a prize for the best article in Canadian political history.

 

2019 – Winner


  • Paul-Étienne Rainville

View past winners

Public History Prize

The award recognizes work that achieves high standards of original research, scholarship, and presentation; brings an innovative public history contribution to its audience; and serves as a model for future work, advancing the field of public history in Canada.

 

2020 – Winner


  • Know History, Refugee Boulevard, Canadian War Museum

View past winners

The Eugene A. Forsey Prize

The Canadian Committee on Labour History is proud to award a prize for the best thesis on labour history.

Eugene A. Forsey Prizes in Canadian Labour and Working-Class History:  Graduate ($1000)

The Canadian Committee on Labour History invites submissions for the Eugene A. Forsey Prize for graduate work on Canadian labour and working-class history. 

The prize is awarded annually for the best graduate thesis completed in the past three years. The awards are determined by a committee established by the executive of the CCLH. In the spirit of the journal Labour l Le Travail itself, the committee interprets the definition of Canadian labour and working-class history broadly. 

For the graduate prize, supervisors may nominate one thesis per competition or an author of a thesis may submit a copy. Submissions of both MA and PhD theses are welcome. Theses defended on or after 1 May 2017 are eligible for consideration in the current competition.  

The Prize is supported by an anonymous donor. With the consent of the late Dr. Forsey's family, the CCLH chose to name the Prize in his honour because of his pioneering work in the field of Canadian labour history. Dr. Forsey was Research Director of the Canadian Congress of Labour and later the Canadian Labour Congress and also served on the committee which founded Labour l Le Travail. 

The deadline for submissions in the current competition is 1 January 2021. 

Prizes will be announced in a forthcoming issue of Labour l Le Travail and on the CHA/SHC website. The graduate prize is $1000. Previous winners of the Prize are listed on the CCLH website. To submit entries to the competition, an electronic copy must be sent by email attachment to Kirk Niergarth, kniergarth@mtroyal.ca.  

 

 

 

2020 – Winner


  • Edward Dunsworth

The Eugene Forsey Undergraduate Prize

The Canadian Committee on Labour History is proud to award a prize for the best thesis on labour history written by undergratudate students.

Eugene A. Forsey Prizes in Canadian Labour and Working-Class History: Undergraduate ($500) 

The Canadian Committee on Labour History invites submissions for the Eugene A. Forsey Prize for undergraduate work on Canadian labour and working-class history. 

Prizes are awarded annually for the best undergraduate essay, or the equivalent are determined by a committee established by the executive of the CCLH. In the spirit of the journal Labour l Le Travail itself, the committee interprets the definition of Canadian labour and working-class history broadly. 

Undergraduate essays may be nominated by course instructors, but nominators are limited to one essay per competition. Additionally, authors may submit their own work. Essays not written at a university or college may be considered for the undergraduate awards. 

The Prize is supported by an anonymous donor. With the consent of the late Dr. Forsey's family, the CCLH chose to name the Prize in his honour because of his pioneering work in the field of Canadian labour history. Dr. Forsey was Research Director of the Canadian Congress of Labour and later the Canadian Labour Congress and also served on the committee which founded Labour l Le Travail. 

The deadline for submissions in the current competition is 1 January 2021. 

Prizes will be announced in a forthcoming issue of Labour l Le Travail and on the CHA/SHC website. The graduate prize is $1000 and the undergraduate prize $500. Previous winners of the Prize are listed on the CCLH website. To submit entries to the competition, an electronic copy must be sent by email attachment to Kirk Niergarth, kniergarth@mtroyal.ca.  

2016 – Winner


  • Camille Blanchard-Séguin

View past winners

Best Article Prize in Labour History

The prize recognizes the best article in labour history.

 

2020 – Winner


  • Sonya Roy

View past winners

The Neil Sutherland Article Prize

This award honours the pioneering work of Canadian historian Neil Sutherland in the history of children and youth by recognizing outstanding contributions to the field. The prize is given out on a biennial basis under the auspices of the History of Children and Youth Group of the Canadian Historical Association.

 

 

 

2020 – Winner


  • Katie Barclay

View past winners

Canadian Committee on Migration, Ethnicity and Transnationalism Article Prize

The CCMET Article Prize acknowledges scholarly articles and book chapters, in English and French, judged to have made an original, significant, and meritorious contribution to the historical study of migration and ethnicity. The winners receive a certificate of achievement and their names are published on the Canadian Historical Association website. A monetary award will be given, pending the results of the fundraising campaign. The prize will be awarded annually by the Canadian Committee on Migration, Ethnicity and Transnationalism of the Canadian Historical Association.

 

2020 – Winner


  • Yukari Takai

View past winners

Prize for Best article on the history of Sexuality

The CCHS prize is designed to recognize excellence in and encourage the growth of scholarly work in the field of the history of sexuality in Canada.Prize for Best article on the history of Sexuality.

 

2020 – Winner


  • Ele Chenier

Business History Book Prize

The biennial prize is awarded to the book that offers the best exploration of Canadian business history.

The 2021 CBHA/ACHA Award for Best Book in Canadian Business History

The CBHA/ACHA, Canada’s leading organization for the study of business in Canada, offers a bi-annual prize for the Best Book in Canadian Business History, broadly defined. The prize committee encourages the submission of books from all methodological perspectives. It is particularly interested in innovative studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline. Scholars, publishers, and other interested parties may submit nominations. Eligible books can have either a Canadian or an international focus, which includes a Canadian perspective. They must be written in English or French and be published during the two years prior to the award, that is, in 2019 and 2020.  Thanks to the generous  donation of an anonymous donor, the award includes a prize of $10,000.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the CBHA/ACHA Prize Coordinator, Professor Dimitry Anastakis, University of Toronto, Department of History, Room 2064, 100 St. George St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3G3. Enquires and applications can also be sent to dimitry.anastakis@utoronto.ca. The deadline for nominations is February 28, 2021.

About the CBHA/ACHA:  Created in 2015, the CBHA/ACHA brings together academics from a wide range of disciplines, archivists and business leaders in the common pursuit of advancing the study and understanding of business history in Canada. Learn more about the CBHA/ACHA at our website, http://cbha-acha.ca/

2019 – Winner


  • Michael Stamm

Best Scholarly Article in Canadian Business History

The 2021 CBHA/ACHA Award for Best Scholarly Article in Canadian Business History

The Canadian Business History Association, Canada’s leading organization for the study of business in Canada, invites submissions for its annual Award for Best Scholarly Article in Canadian Business History.  The prize committee encourages the submission of articles from all methodological perspectives, and from any scholarly journal or journalistic source (provided the article has the necessary diligence and detail). It is particularly interested in innovative studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline. Scholars, publishers, journalists and other interested parties may submit nominations. Eligible articles can have either a Canadian or an international focus, which includes a Canadian perspective. They must be written in English or French and be published during the year prior to the award.

To be eligible of the award, the author of the article and/or nominator must be a current member of the CBHA/ACHA. In the event that the article is co-authored, at least one of the authors must be a current member. In the award’s first year (2021), articles from the previous two years of publication may be considered (2019, 2020). The prize includes a certificate, and an announcement in the CBHA/ACHA Prospectus.

Starting in 2021, the prize may be awarded at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association (June), though it may be announced prior to that event.

An electronic copy of the article must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the CBHA/ACHA Prize Coordinator, Professor Dimitry Anastakis, University of Toronto, Department of History, dimitry.anastakis@utoronto.ca. The deadline for nominations is February 28, 2021.

About the CBHA/ACHA:  Created in 2015, the CBHA/ACHA brings together academics from a wide range of disciplines, archivists and business leaders in the common pursuit of advancing the study and understanding of business history in Canada.  Learn more about the CBHA/ACHA at our website, http://cbha-acha.ca/


Network in Canadian History and Environment Prize for Best Article or Book Chapter

This new prize is awarded every other year for meritorious publications that make important and innovative contributions to the field of Canadian environmental history, broadly conceived. This prize was generously sponsored by a donation from founding NiCHE Director, Alan MacEachern.

Due Date for Nominations: 31 December 2020

Nominations may come from authors, publishers, organizations, or any other individuals.

Submit Nominations Here
Eligibility criteria:

The work of any individual(s) conducting scholarly research in the field of Canadian environmental history will be eligible for consideration.

Articles, and book chapters that
(i) use the tools and methods of historical inquiry to examine the relationship between humans and the non-human world; and
(ii) focus on the territory that now makes up Canada and/or involve individuals, groups, or institutions closely associated with what later became Canada are eligible for consideration.

Articles and book chapters can be nominated only once.

Articles and book chapters must bear the copyright imprint of one of the two years preceding the year in which the prize is awarded, i.e., articles published in 2019 or 2020 are eligible for the 2021 prize.

Articles and book chapters published by publishing houses or journals located outside Canada are eligible for consideration.

Any piece of scholarship that meets the eligibility criteria for a given year’s prize and that demonstrates substantial and original scholarship may be nominated (e.g. edited volumes, scholarly editions of primary documents). Translations may not be nominated if they have already won this prize for publication in their original language.

Scholarship authored by more than one person is eligible for consideration.

Nominations for this prize should be submitted before 31 December 2020.

Please contact us if you have any questions.


View past winners

The Canadian Oral History Association (COHA) Prize

The Canadian Oral History Association (COHA) Prize is awarded to an outstanding example of oral history practice.

2018 – Winner


  • Kristina R. Llewellyn & Nicholas Ng-A-Foo

View past winners

Media and Communication History Committee Prize

The Media and Communication History Article Prize was awarded to a graduate student. The committee that awarded the prize suspended its operations in 2019.

2016 – Winner


  • Laurie Laplanche

Latest from Twitter

#cdnhist #twitterstorians #HistoryMatters @ideas_idees L'inscription au congrès virtuel 2021 de la Fédération des s… https://t.co/mh5kqntaiw

View all Tweets

Contact Us

Canadian Historical Association
1912-130 Albert Street
Ottawa, ON, K1P 5G4